The Meeting Place: Maori and Pakeha Encounters, 1642-1840

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More information about this seller Contact this seller. Language: English. Brand new Book. An account focusing on the encounters between the Maori and Pakeha-or European settlers-and the process of mutual discovery from to around , this New Zealand history book argues that both groups inhabited a middle ground in which neither could dictate the political, economic, or cultural rules of engagement.

Seller Inventory AAC Book Description Condition: New. Seller Inventory n.

Book Review: Vincent O’Malley, The Meeting Place: Maori and Pakeha Encounters, 1642-1840

Book Description Auckland University Press. Seller Inventory ING Bookseller Inventory ST Seller Inventory ST Not Signed; An account focusing on the encounters between the Maori and Pakeha-or European settlers-and the process of mutual discovery from to around , this New Zealand history book argues that both groups inhabited a middle ground in which neither could dictate the political, economic, or cultural ru. Book Description Auckland Univ Pr, Condition: Brand New.

In Stock. Seller Inventory x The years after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, the presence of the British Government and regular settlement in New Zealand by the British meant that the European settlers were able to be more self-reliant. If you are reading this book for fun I suggest skipping the introduction.

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It took me two goes to read through and appreciate the introduction — I was concerned the whole book would be as academic and dry. Instead, there were parts of the book, particularly the very earliest encounters, that I read almost as though it was a thriller — I was keen to learn what would happen next! Concepts around gift-giving are discussed in the early part of the book.

It was not necessary, however, that this take place straight away.

History books on early encounters between Maori and Pakeha

Why should the average home own this book? This is our story. That would be consistent with the old Maori saying about the past always being before us.

From this perspective, history is less a linear story of boundless progress, than a more circular tale in which we sense we have somehow been here before. New Zealand, here in the early years of the 21st century, stands on the threshold of a world it last inhabited nearly two centuries ago.

That might seem a surprising claim, given that we associate the early s with conflict and chaos. And it is true that pre-Treaty Aotearoa could be a dangerous and volatile place. Those factors allowed Maori and Pakeha to remain comfortable in their own cultures, while finding fresh ways of dealing with each other in the spaces in between. The remarkable Maori demographic recovery from near extinction in the early 20th century through to a booming population today, along with the resurgent Maori economy, point to the potential for a new middle ground to emerge.

Hapu and iwi, newly recapitalised through the Treaty settlements process, are again becoming major players in our economy. New forms of accommodation may emerge out of mutual self-interest because Maori and Pakeha again find things of value in each other that cannot be obtained by other means. Finding the middle ground is of course as challenging today as it was two centuries ago.

As the first Europeans began to take up residence in New Zealand in the early s, they were forced to find ways of living with and alongside their far more numerous Maori neighbours.

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Marmon, for example, engaged in tribal warfare alongside his host tribe and was believed to have also indulged in the cannibal feasts that often accompanied victory on the battlefield. Yet these mostly illiterate and uncouth men many of them Irish Catholics, a further mark against them in the minds of the so-called respectable classes were drawn to the Maori world and learnt to abide by its rules since they knew there would be consequences if they failed to do so.

For the missionaries who took up residence in the north of New Zealand after , or others such as visiting sealers and whalers, absorption into the tribe was not an option. Once Maori gained access to muskets, they were in a position to impose their will on the few hundred Europeans resident in New Zealand.

But to do so risked driving these people away, and so ending the steady access to iron, muskets, axes, hoes, blankets and pipes that Maori had come increasingly to depend upon.

The Meeting Place: Maori and Pakeha Encounters, 1642-1840

Because Maori and Pakeha had a mutual need for one another, new rules and new forms of engagement that drew upon both cultures and societies but belonged wholly to neither began to emerge. Maori also learned to shake hands with the newcomers, while transferring across to the gesture the meanings of their own hongi. Missionaries complained that early Maori handshakes went on forever, the longer this took the more it was said to reflect the depth of feeling that went into it.

Both parties learnt to trade with one another but not always in ways that either group would have previously understood. For Maori outright haggling over the terms of trade was a definite no-no before